Archive for the ‘Mushroom Farming’ Category

Magnificent Mushrooms: Behind the Scenes with a Mushroom Farmer

Mushrooms are truly a magnificent piece of nature, and their growing process is more scientific and interesting than one might thing. Follow along as Council Representative, Kathleen Preis, talks to a local mushroom farmer about the fascinating world of growing mushrooms.

It’s a cold winter day here in Pennsylvania, and even with snow banks reaching up to my knees, local mushrooms are being grown and harvested today. Mushrooms are one of the only items in the produce section that are grown every single day of the year, and it’s an amazing process to learn about. Lucky for me, I am right in the heart of mushroom growing country (Kennett Square, PA), with access to dozens of family farms that grow over 60% of the US’ fresh mushrooms.

Kathleen: What exactly is a mushroom?
Mushroom Farmer: Mushrooms are fungi, which are so distinct in nature they are classified as their own kingdom – separate from plants or animals. There are thousands of fungi in the world, but only a few are edible. Most mushrooms you find in your local supermarket are grown indoors, on a mushroom farm.

Chef Bill Briwa Cooking Mushrooms

Kathleen: Tell me about the mushroom growing process.
Mushroom Farmer: Mushrooms are our most unique growing vegetable, and mushroom growing is one of the most unusual stories in agriculture. Before they make their way to your plate, mushrooms go through a growing process in a highly controlled environment unlike that of any other produce.

How Mushrooms Grow Infographic

Kathleen: Are mushrooms good for you?
Mushroom Farmer: Up until a decade ago, most believed mushrooms were consumed only for their flavor, and didn’t contribute anything nutritional. However, as we invest in more nutrition research we find mushrooms have a great nutrition story to tell! Mushrooms provide many of the nutritional attributes of produce, as well as attribute more commonly found in meat, beans or grains. Mushrooms are low in calories, fat-free, cholesterol-free, gluten-free, and very low in sodium, yet they provide important nutrients, including selenium, potassium (8%), riboflavin, niacin, vitamin D and more.

Good-For-You Mushroom Recipes

Kathleen: What’s your favorite mushroom recipe?
Mushroom Farmer: While I enjoy complex mushroom dishes like this Portabella Mushroom Burger With Crispy Mushrooms and Roasted Garlic Gorgonzola Sauce, my family and I cannot resist classic comfort foods like meatballs, tacos, and spaghetti. My current favorite is the Mushroom & Turkey Meatloaf. The mushrooms blend seamlessly with the turkey, and add moisture!

Blended Mushroom & Turkey Meatloaf

 

Top 10 Highlights of the 2013 Mushroom Fest

James Beard award-nominated writer, editor, and recipe developer, Joy Manning attended the 28th annual Mushroom Festival in Kennett Square on behalf of The Mushroom Council. Take a look at her top ten highlights and mark your calendars for next September. 

Flavorful and nutritious, mushrooms are the kind of ingredient that can inspire a party. And for the past 28 years, mushroom growers and the eaters who love them have made the annual Mushroom Festival in Kennett Square, Pa., one of the biggest and best parties in food. Spanning the weekend after Labor Day each year, it extends the summer fun one weekend longer with live music, contests, games, a car show, carnival rides, and—of course—tons of delicious food. I had such a great time during my visit this year that I’ve already earmarked that weekend for mushrooms in 2014. Here my top 10 highlights from this year’s fest. If you were there, too, please leave your own highlights in the comments!

Farm Tour

On the quick bus ride between the festival and the Caputo & Guest Mushrooms farm, our driver asked the crowd on board who had driven more than 100 miles to be at the festival. Hands shot up all around the bus, with some folks coming from as far away as California. That should be no surprise—mushroom lovers are an enthusiastic bunch. Mark Malchione, the farm manager, led the tour of the mushroom house, where we saw every stage of the process, from the logs that are made from grains and sawdust to give the mushrooms nutrients and a place to grow, to tiny newly sprouted spores and fully sprouted shiitakes looking ready to slice into a stir fry. Malchione also provided a great shopping tip: look under the cap when buying shiitakes. They should look fresh, unblemished and creamy white. His definitely did.

Talula’s Table

Many food fanatics around the country are already familiar with Talula’s Table, a Kennett Square market and restaurant that is known as one of the most difficult-to-get reservations in the US. What the chefs there may be less known for is their dexterity with mushrooms. They made a variety of treats inspired by the local bounty, including wonderfully crisp mushroom spring rolls.

Chef Jack Mavraj in the Culinary Tent

There was a full roster of great chefs—include celeb Carla Hall–doing mushroom-centric demonstrations in the Culinary Tent. I watched Kennett Square’s own chef Jack Mavraj shake his skillet for the crowd. He cooked homemade agnolotti, fresh pasta dumplings stuffed with three kinds of mushrooms and braised short ribs. He also made a robust four-mushroom sauce—filled with shiitake, oyster, cremini, and maitake mushrooms—to serve with the pasta and short ribs. I may make a vegetarian version in my own kitchen this fall.

Mushroom Shopping

At a couple stands throughout the festival, tables were set up with tons of different local mushrooms for sale. Obviously, the wares could not have been fresher. They were clearly just picked! Some oyster mushrooms were $8 pound—about half the price I might pay in the supermarket. It was the perfect place for someone like me, who cooks with mushrooms a few times a week, to stock up.

Oyster Mushroom Fritters with Feta, Hot Sauce and Spring Greens

Low in calories and rich in nutrients like selenium and Vitamin D, mushrooms have rightly earned their place in the pantheon of good-for-you foods. That doesn’t mean they aren’t also perfect deep fried and served with cheese, spicy sauce, and a salad. The meaty oyster mushrooms tasted almost like boneless chicken wings, especially when mixed with the cheese and sauce. Would I eat this every day? No. Am I counting down the days until I eat it again at 2014’s mushroom festival? Yes.

Breaded Button Mushrooms

Another delicious choice in fried mushrooms: the classic breaded mushroom. I have always appreciated a pizzeria that sells these kind of fried mushrooms, just plain buttons covered in a basic, crunchy breading. At the festival, this classic got a big upgrade just from the pristine, fresh local mushrooms that were used.

Official Mushroom Festival Soup

Even though it was a warm beautiful day, everyone at the festival seemed to want a bowl of steaming mushroom soup. Something about the mushroom’s deep earthy flavor makes for such a perfect bowl of comfort, and the official soup of the festival was no different.

Painted Mushrooms

Not every mushroom highlight was edible. On display at various shops throughout Kennett Square were beautiful, hand-painted mushrooms. Local artists projected their visions onto concrete mushroom forms three feet high; the results decorated the festival and were sold via silent auction.

Mushroom Growers Exhibit

The big shady tent where growers set up tables to represent all the stages of the mushroom growing process was a huge draw. Kids, parents, and grandparents all seemed equally captivated at how the process works. Best of all, the growers themselves were on hand to chat with festivalgoers and patiently answer all the questions everyone had about their work.

Ice Cream Stop at La Michoacana 

As I headed out of the festival, my last stop had to be dessert. The homemade ice cream churned at La Michoacan is a must for any visit to Kennett Square. The shop was into the spirit of the event with plenty of mushroom ice cream bars on hand, and this was clearly a popular choice.

Fascinating Farming: Dr. Clyde's Inside View of Mushrooms

What do you get when you take a well-respected nutritionist chemist (and all-around curious guy) to a mushroom farm? You get an excited Dr. Clyde Wilson.  There aren’t a lot of secrets in the mushroom farming business but it’s still not the kind of farming that most Americans grow up familiar with. As you’ll see/hear below one of the major reasons for this is that mushrooms grow best in dimly lit spaces. Thanks to Dr. Clyde, we’d like to take a minute or two to shed some (metaphoric) light on how one of your favorite foods is grown.

Mushrooms are grown from the kind of farming where your food likes to be kept in the dark…but you don’t need to be.